LOMA
Music, 1995 - 2008


Recorded in Studio Electric Avenue, Hamburg
by Zlaya, Thomas Mahringer and Tobias Levin
Mixes and Mastering
by Thies Mynther in Cloud Hill Recordings, Hamburg
Poljska Recorded and MIxed
by Ted Geier in Sterne-Studio, Hamburg

All music made by LOMA


LOMA:
Guitar, Voice, Keyboard: Adnan Softić
Drums, Voice: Jons Vukorep


Loma's power is contained in insinuating an outburst, which finally is refused. Punk past and abstract art future, Slavic folklore and American noise, love and violence are contracted to form a bulky solid body by this Hamburg-based duo. (...)

Jan Moeller



Calling

We take all the things that distinguish a band – pressure, presence and a unique sound – and extract whatever we can: melodies from the notes, texts from the vocals, verses and choruses from the songs; not always everything but at least enough for the tracks to become brittle and in danger of falling apart, even when they still hold together. On this threshold to dissolution it becomes evident what music is able to achieve when it keeps on going despite inner resistance: It makes it possible to experience an area of transgression, in which everything stands or falls, falling while standing and standing while falling. Loma’s intention is, through their music, to move towards and somehow inside of this threshold area. They do not do this consciously. Things must first develop. In Loma this is a result of the dynamic between the two parts of the band, Adnan Softić and Jons Vukorep, between the guitar playing and vocals of the one and the drumming and vocals of the other. Potentially, this is always just as much a collaborative as it is a competitive action. However it is not really only about improvisation. There are arrangements, one can hear that, because there are sequences built into the pieces. However it is just as evident that the arrangements are not the decisive factor in Loma’s music. The calling is audibly more important than the arranging. Loma develop most of their pieces in a dialogue of vocals. One of them begins, sings, calls or shouts something and the other calls something back, completes the sentence or joins in with a note and holds it. Sometimes the sounds are Bosnian words, which they hurl at each other and at the audience like slogans. Sometimes though they are calls that only consist of a single note (or sound) that one of them emits and the other one joins in with. Together, they hold the note for as long as seems appropriate. Long. Or short. Calling is more than just a motif but is also a way for Softić and Vukorep to bundle their energy and direct it outwards.
Perhaps the best, or even the only appropriate way to respond to Loma is not to talk about them but to call back to them and hold the note as long as one feels is appropriate:
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauuu uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauaaaaaaaa
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaauaaaaaaaauauuuuuuuuuuuaaaaaaaaa uaaaaaaaaaa
However, maybe that is still not enough. Loma’s music is not without content. The threshold area that Loma enters, between standing and falling, between articulated music and pure dynamics, reverberates with many audible elements that are not explicitly played, voiced or sung. There are a whole lot of songs and melodies that can be heard in Loma’s pieces, yet they are never completely tangible. Softić’s chords are just as frequently plucked strings as they are open strings or struck (ist das mit “klingende Seite gemeint?) and muted strings. Between unplucked and plucked, played and halted tones, tensions develop that enable one to hear notes that no-one is really playing and as a result no-one can really control though they still somehow exist. It is like with feelings. Vukorep’s drum-playing is equally mechanical as it is emotional and powerful, because it is driven by the urge to control a feeling rhythmically, although one is not able to control it fully. As a result the rhythm is continually drawn out from within and broken down. However this never stops the machine but is in fact exactly what gets it running.
One could say a great deal about the songs and emotions that are both present and absent in Loma’s music. Yet sometimes by voicing the unspoken one only makes it even more unspeakable. However what really characterizes Loma is that they make no secret of many things that are unspoken: when they play, the place where they both are and are not – Bosnia – is a place where people traditionally called out to each other from the hills across the valleys, in a language that Loma sometimes uses, sometimes doesn’t. In this way, the memory is perhaps pinpointed. However this does not say much about themselves, except that in general the subject of recollections and emotions is always somehow there and not there. The decisive factor is simply that Loma plays out this blurriness from here and there with complete clarity, on all levels of text, tone, melody, pure sound, solidarity and dissolution. However, each recollection, each feeling not only has a history but also a present and the strength to transcend the past. That is the point at which every piece by Loma charges and discharges its energy differently, now, in the moment in which one hears it, and on the other hand would perhaps like to answer in this and no other way:
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Uaaaaaa aaaaa
Aaa


Jan Verwoert


If one would want to imagine a concept that combines music, art and "Slavic soul", one would probably arrive at gothic and Laibach. (...) But how does a band sound that doesn't want to avoid blowing a breach into the music with their "Slavic soul", yet resisting arty intricacies and discarding the eighties. LOMA has found a style that is equally exciting and entertaining to listen to. They are set up with drums and guitar; most of the time the guitar starts out with a theme as thick as coffee grounds, from which flow soft chords like viscous cream, lending the song the right texture. These are often chords partially borrowed from century-old folk songs and, played with constancy and directness, hardly ever missing a string, are hardly to be surpassed in their impenetrability. Here we are not confronted with rock music or with the attempt to confront the audience with an especially firm, varied set peppered with breathtaking breaks - LOMA creates a nearly nervous sense of tenseness, which aims at charging and discharging itself with a simplicity equally as defiant as radical. The songs are not only minimalistic due to the missing, yet not missed parts and breaks, but also because of the obsessive insistence on only one single state of tension, making the individual song true and rich. The tunes are instrumentals only interrupted in their flow by shoutings, as is also custom in the traditional music of the region, articulating emotional release, sometimes whistling is to be heard, before it becomes too pleasant, as listeners start to settle in the loaded condition.
The guitar and the drums, which cut the creamy cords to pieces like a confectioners knife, have accepted the task of repetitively embracing an idea rarely longer than two bars, evoking a scenario of Storm and Stress, War and Peace, Cabal and Love without reminding of flossy, oppressive bog rock sentimentalities. In this context the measures normally applied in music for conveying violence are simply omitted or reversed, yielding highest satisfaction from basic titbits.
After all, LOMA is a colloquial word used in Sarajevo to signify "little", derived from the word "Malo".

Elena Lange
Musik, 1995 - 2008


Recorded in Studio Electric Avenue, Hamburg
by Zlaya, Thomas Mahringer and Tobias Levin
Mixes and Mastering
by Thies Mynther in Cloud Hill Recordings, Hamburg
Poljska Recorded and MIxed
by Ted Geier in Sterne-Studio, Hamburg

All music made by LOMA


LOMA:
Guitar, Voice, Keyboard: Adnan Softić
Drums, Voice: Jons Vukorep


Lomas Kraft liegt darin, den Ausbruch anzudeuten, aber letztlich doch verweigern. Punk-Vergangenheit und Abstrakt-Art-Zukunft, slawische Folklore und Ami-Noise, Liebe und Hiebe bündelt das Hamburger Duo zu einem sperrigen Festkörper. (…)

Jan Möller



Zurufen

Was eine Band ausmacht – Druck, Präsenz und der eigene Sound –, das nehmen wir alles und ziehen davon dann ab, was irgend geht: aus den Tönen Melodien, aus dem Gesang Texte, aus den Songs Strophen und Refrains; nicht immer alles, aber doch zumindest so viel, dass die Stücke spröde werden und auseinanderfallen könnten, selbst dann noch, wenn sie doch zusammenhalten. Auf dieser Schwelle zur Auflösung zeigt sich, was Musik kann, wenn sie trotz ihrer inneren Widerstände weitergeht: Sie macht einen Grenzbereich erfahrbar, wo alles steht und fällt, mit dem Stehen fällt und Fallen steht. Loma legen es darauf an, sich an diesen Grenzbereich heran- und irgendwie in ihn hineinzuspielen. Bewusst geht das nicht. Es muss sich erst ergeben. Bei Loma ergibt es sich aus den Dynamiken zwischen den beiden Teilen der Band, Adnan Softić und Jons Vukorep, zwischen dem Gitarrenspiel und Singen des einen und dem Schlagzeugspiel und Singen des anderen. Das ist immer potenziell genauso ein Mit- wie Gegeneinander. Dabei geht es nicht wirklich rein um Improvisation. Es gibt Absprachen, das hört man, weil Abläufe in den Stücken feststehen. Aber die Absprachen sind genauso spürbar nicht das Entscheidende in der Musik von Loma. Das Zurufen ist hörbar wichtiger als das Absprechen. Loma entwickeln die meisten ihrer Stücke im Dialoggesang. Der eine fängt an, singt, ruft oder schreit etwas, und der andere ruft etwas zurück, vervollständigt den Satz oder stimmt in einen Ton mit ein und hält ihn. Zum Teil sind es Worte in Bosnisch, die sie, wie Parolen, einander und dem Publikum an den Kopf werfen. Zum Teil sind es aber auch Rufe, die nur aus einem Ton (oder Laut) bestehen, den der eine ausstößt und in den der andere dann mit einstimmt. Zusammen halten sie den Ton dann so lange, wie es richtig erscheint. Lang. Oder kurz. Mehr als bloß ein Motiv ist das Zurufen ein Weg, auf dem Softić und Vukorep ihre Kräfte bündeln und nach außen richten.
Vielleicht wäre deshalb die beste, wenn nicht sogar einzig angemessene Art und Weise, auf Loma einzugehen, nicht über sie zu reden, sondern zurückzurufen und den Ton nach Gefühl zu halten:
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauuu uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaauaaaaaaaa
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaauaaaaaaaauauuuuuuuuuuuaaaaaaaaa uaaaaaaaaaa
Aber vielleicht ist es damit auch noch nicht getan. Denn die Musik von Loma ist nicht ohne Inhalte. In dem Grenzbereich von Stehen und Fallen – artikulierter Musik und reiner Dynamik –, in den sich Loma hineinbewegen, schwingt spürbar vieles mit, was nicht ausdrücklich gespielt, gesagt und gesungen wird. Das sind lauter Lieder und Melodien, die in Lomas Stücken anklingen, ohne gänzlich greifbar zu werden. In Softićs Akkorden sind so oft genauso viele gegriffene wie leer schwingende oder klingende und abgedämpfte Seiten. Zwischen leeren und vollen, gespielten und abgestoppten Tönen entwickeln sich Spannungen, die einen Töne hören lassen, die keiner wirklich spielt und deswegen auch keiner wirklich kontrollieren kann, die aber trotzdem irgendwie da sind. Das ist ähnlich wie mit den Gefühlen. Vukoreps Schlagzeugspiel ist genauso maschinell wie emotional, treibend, weil getrieben von dem Drang, ein Gefühl rhythmisch zu kontrollieren, was nicht völlig zu kontrollieren ist, und deshalb den Rhythmus immer wieder auch von innen aushebt und zersetzt, was die Maschine aber nie stoppt, sondern genau das ist, was sie zum Laufen bringt.
Über die Lieder und Gefühle, die in der Musik zugleich da und nicht da sind, könnte man viel sprechen. Aber mit Ausgesprochenem macht man das Unausgesprochene manchmal auch nur unaussprechbarer. Was Loma dabei aber absolut auszeichnet, ist, dass sie aus vielem Unausgesprochenem kein besonderes Geheimnis machen: Der Ort, wo sie, wenn sie spielen, zugleich sind und nicht sind, Bosnien, ist ein Ort, wo man sich traditionell von den Hügeln über die Täler Dinge zugerufen hat, in der Sprache, die Loma manchmal gebrauchen, manchmal nicht. Damit ist die Erinnerung vielleicht lokalisiert. Aber über sie selbst ist noch nicht viel gesagt, außer dass ganz allgemein das, wovon Erinnerungen und Gefühle handeln, immer irgendwie da und nicht da ist. Das Entscheidende ist einfach, dass sich Loma mit aller Schärfe diese Unschärfe von fort und da erspielen, auf allen Ebenen von Text, Laut, Melodie, reinem Sound, Zusammenhalt und Auflösung. Aber jede Erinnerung, jedes Gefühl hat dann eben nicht nur eine Geschichte, sondern auch eine Gegenwart und Kraft, die die Vergangenheit übersteigt. Das ist der Punkt, wo jedes Stück von Loma seine Energie je anders auf- und entlädt, in dem Moment, jetzt, wo man es hören kann und wiederum vielleicht nur so und nicht anders darauf antworten will:
Uaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Uaaaaaa aaaaa
aaa


Jan Verwoert







Wenn jemand sich spontan etwas unter den Begriffen Musik, Kunst und „Slawische Seele“ vorstellen möchte, würde dabei wahrscheinlich so etwas wie Gothic und Laibach herauskommen. (…)
Aber wie klingt so eine Band, die nicht umhin will, mit ihrer „Slawischen Seele“ eine Bresche in die Musik zu schlagen, dabei aber kunst-mäßigen Verzwickungen widersteht und die Achtziger Jahre die Achtziger sein läßt? LOMA hat einen Weg gefunden, dem zuzuhören ebenso spannend wie unterhaltend im beste Wortesinne ist. Sie spielen mit Schlagzeug und Gitarre - meist beginnt die Gitarre mit einem kaffeesatzdickem Thema, aus dem weiche Akkorde wie dickflüssige Sahne herausquillen und dem Song die richtige Konsistenz verleihen. Die sind oft Akkorde, die teilweise jahrhundertealten Volksliedern entliehen sind und mit der Art des durchgehenden, geradlinigen, kaum eine Seite auslassenden Anschlags an Undurchdringlichkeit kaum zu überbieten sind. Hier haben wir es nicht mit Rock zu tun oder mit der Anstrengung, dem Publikum ein besonders knackiges, abwechslungsreiches, mit Breaks nur so übersätes Set zu präsentieren - es geht bei LOMA um eine fast nervöse Anspannung, die sich in vielen Stücken durch eine ebenso aufsässige wie radikale Einfachheit auf - und zu entladen weiß. Minimalistisch sind die Stücke nicht nur wegen der fehlenden, aber nicht vermißten Parts und Breaks, sondern auch wegen des obsessiven Beharrens auf einem einzigen Spannungszustand, der das Stück rund und fett macht. Die Stücke sind instrumental, nur Shoutings unterbrechen den Fluß scharf mit auch den in der traditionellen Musik üblichen artikulierten Gefühlausbrüchen, auch Gepfiffen wird dann und wann, bevor es zu angenehm wird, weil der Hörer es sich im aufgeladenen Zustand gemütlich gemacht hat.
Die Gitarre und das die Cremigkeit der Akkorde scharf wie ein Konditormesser zerschneidende Schlagzeug haben sich zur Aufgabe gemacht, repetetiv an eine einzige, selten über mehr als zwei Takte gehende Idee ein Szenario von Sturm und Drang, Krieg und Frieden, Kabale und Liebe zu schmiegen, ohne das beklemmende und aufgemotzte Bog Rock- Sentimentalitäten zu erinnern. Dabei werden die Mittel, mit denen Gewaltigkeit in der Musik normalerweise vermittelt wird, einfach weglassen oder umgedreht: mit kleinen einfachen Bissen den größten Genuß erzielen.
Und schließlich: LOMA heißt in der Sarajevoer Umgangsprache „wenig“. Es kommt vom Wort „Malo“.

Elena Lange

[close]